Articles Tagged with Boston pedestrian accident lawyers

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Ronald E. Gluck, Marc L. Breakstone and David W. White of Breakstone, White & Gluck

We are pleased to announce that Breakstone, White & Gluck and our attorneys have been recognized by Super Lawyers for the 15th year. Super Lawyers is a rating service of outstanding lawyers who have attained a high-degree of peer recognition and professional achievement. Lawyers are rated nationwide, across 70 practice areas, with just a select number recognized.

2018 Recognition

In 2018, our lawyers have been named to a number of Super Lawyers lists, including the 2018 Top New England Super Lawyers,  2018 Top 100 Massachusetts Super Lawyers and 2018 Massachusetts Super Lawyers in personal injury and medical malpractice, and the 2018 Rising Stars list.

Marc L. Breakstone has been selected to the Top 100 New England Super LawyersTop 100 Massachusetts Super Lawyers and to the 2018 Massachusetts Super Lawyers list, recognized as a top-rated medical malpractice attorney in Boston.

David W. White has been selected to the 2018 Massachusetts Super Lawyers list, recognized as a top-rated personal injury attorney in Boston.

Ronald E. Gluck has been selected to the 2018 Massachusetts Super Lawyers list, recognized as a top-rated personal injury attorney in Boston.

Reza Breakstone has been selected to the 2018 Massachusetts Rising Stars list.

About Breakstone, White & Gluck

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Reza Breakstone

Marc L. Breakstone, David W. White and Ronald E. Gluck founded the law firm of Breakstone, White & Gluck in Boston in 1992. Reza Breakstone joined the firm as an associate in 2015.

At Breakstone, White & Gluck, our Boston personal injury lawyers fight for justice for those who have been seriously injured or killed by the negligence and wrongdoing of others. Our lawyers have won numerous record-setting verdicts and settlements. We specialize in cases involving personal injury, medical malpractice, wrongful death, traumatic brain injuries and motor vehicle crashes. Read more.


Super Lawyers Ratings: Built on Peer Reviews

The 2018 New England Super Lawyers listings, just released, are meant to serve as a resource to help those searching for attorneys and are available for free online. Most years, they are published in Boston Magazine. When you visit a law firm’s website, you can also look for the Super Lawyers badge to see if a lawyer has been rated.

Super Lawyers, a Thomson Reuters business, recognizes the top 5 percent of lawyers across the state, along with a Rising Stars list highlighting the top lawyers under 40 years old (or the top 2.5 percent statewide). Lawyers are rated through a multiphase selection process, including a statewide survey of lawyers, independent research evaluation and peer reviews by other top-rated attorneys in a practice area. The peer reviews are what make the Super Lawyers listings so valuable to consumers and other attorneys. When you call a lawyer rated by Super Lawyers, you can trust other highly experienced lawyers have already reviewed the lawyer’s skills and experience in their specialty.

The independent evaluation considers the following 12 indicators:

  • Verdicts/Settlements
  • Transactions
  • Representative Clients
  • Experience
  • Honors/Awards
  • Special licenses/certifications
  • Position within the law firm
  • Bar and/or professional activity
  • Pro bono and community service
  • Scholarly lectures/writings
  • Education/employment background
  • Other outstanding achievements

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Elderly couple on crosswalkPedestrians are facing a crisis on the roads, here in Boston and across the country. From 2009 to 2015, there was a 46 percent increase in pedestrian deaths across the U.S. (Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration). 

Now, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is stepping in with a comprehensive set of recommendations to improve safety, including: Continue reading

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With students back to school in Massachusetts, local police departments are stressing safety around school buses while stepping up enforcement of drivers who fail to stop for pedestrians in crosswalks.

If a traffic enforcement sting came to your community, how many drivers would be stopped and cited for unsafe driving? Would you be among them?

We ask these questions as students head back to school across Massachusetts, in communities from Boston and Cambridge to Plymouth and Brockton to Worcester and Springfield.

Police departments across the state have set up traffic enforcement over the past few weeks, focusing on drivers who are not stopping for pedestrians in crosswalks and school buses. A few of the communities include New Bedford, Attleboro and South Boston.

In South Boston, the surveillance followed the tragic death of a 2-year-old in a traffic crash. The child was being pushed in a stroller on the sidewalk, when a van and car collided. The van plowed onto the sidewalk, injuring and ultimately killing the young boy. A day after the crash, the Boston Police Department and Massachusetts State Police set up a traffic enforcement initiative focusing on crosswalk enforcement, speeding and other unsafe driving behaviors. Within a few days, officers had issued approximately 500 citations for traffic violations. This is a very telling number, one Massachusetts drivers can’t ignore.

Breakstone, White & Gluck is a Boston law firm which specializes in personal injury, medical malpractice and car accident cases. Our firm is committed to safety for children, giving away over 20,000 bicycle helmets to children in Massachusetts through our Project KidSafe campaign. With experience representing clients who have been injured in pedestrian crosswalk accidents and other traffic crashes, we offer these tips for safe driving:

Slow down at crosswalks. Students who walk to school may have a crossing guard help them across the street. Always slow down as you approach crossing guards and children. Make eye contact with the crossing guard and assume you should stop. The crossing guard will wave you through when it’s safe to go.

But even when there is no crossing guard, drivers must stop for pedestrians in the crosswalk when there is a “Walk” or green signal. Other times, drivers have a responsibility to yield the right of way by slowing or stopping for pedestrians in the crosswalk. This includes times when pedestrians are in the crosswalk on the same side as the driver and when pedestrians are approaching from the other half of the lane and within 10 feet. There is a $200 fine for crosswalk violations in Massachusetts.

The best thing to do is approach crosswalks slowly and stop if you see anyone even near the entrance of the crosswalk. If you can, make eye contact with them, then wave for them to go. Depending on whether other cars stop, they may not be able to immediately cross. You may need to be patient for a few moments.

M.G.L. c.89 § 11 is the law governing pedestrian rights in crosswalks in Massachusetts. Read more about the law.

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Local communities are restricting road use to stop the flood of drivers who use Waze and other traffic apps.

Commuting is a battle in Massachusetts, full of frustrations and hazards. But residents, communities and lawmakers continue to fight back to improve safety.

On Monday, the state House of Representatives considered a controversial bill proposing new fines for jaywalking and jaywalking while distracted (or as The Boston Globe writes, “Jay-texters”). Meanwhile, WBZ reports communities are closing off roads in response to traffic apps such as Waze and Google Maps.

20141118_crosswalkPedestrian safety was the focus of several NBC Boston reports last night. One segment was called “Boston’s Crosswalk Crisis” and another was called “Cro$$walk Crisis: Private Funding for Public Ways.” They are worth viewing for anyone who lives or works in Boston. A few figures from the reports:

  • Pedestrian deaths rose 15 percent in Boston in 2016.
  • Nine pedestrians have died this year, up 30 percent from this time last year.