Articles Tagged with “Fisher-Price recall”

Fisher-Price Rock 'n Play Sleeper

Fisher-Price has recalled its Rock ‘n Play sleeper after an investigation found more than 30 infants died while using it.

It once looked the perfect place to nap and cuddle. But this adorable product – the Fisher-Price Rock ‘n Play Sleeper – wasn’t ever safe. Fisher-Price and the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) announced the recall of 4.7 million sleepers on April 12, 2019. Parents are being urged disassemble the sleeper and stop using it. The company expects to spend the next several months processing recalls.

Prior to the company’s action, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) had joined Consumer Reports in calling for the product’s removal, stating the Fisher-Price Rock ‘n Play failed to comply with its recommendations, which state infants should only sleep on flat and firm surfaces. Further, the AAP advises infants should not be left on the same surface as other bedding, toys or bumpers, which could increase the risk of infant suffocation or choking.

Fisher-Price, a division of Mattel, is asking parents to contact the company for a refund or voucher toward another Fisher-Price product. The company will offer a full refund for Rock ‘n Play sleepers purchased during the past six months.

Resources:

Fisher-Price Rock ‘n Play Recall Notice, Consumer Product Safety Commission

Mattel and Fisher-Price Recall Page for Parents

The Week of Bad Headlines for Fisher-Price

Fisher-Price and the CPSC announced the product’s recall on Friday, April 12th, following days of pressure from safety organizations. Fisher-Price had initially resisted.

On April 5, the CPSC and Fisher-Price released an initial warning and announced 10 infants had died in the Rock ‘n Play between 2015 and 2019. The infants were all 3 months or older and died after rolling over from their back to their stomach or side.

At that point, there was no recall, but parents were advised to stop placing children in the sleeper once they reach 3 months old, or earlier if they begin turning themselves over.

Days later, Consumer Reports came out with a troubling report linking the product to not 10, but 32 infant deaths since the 2009 release. The consumer watchdog called on the CPSC to immediately issue a recall of the defective product. In response, Fisher-Price said the company did not believe any of these deaths were caused by the sleeper. Rather, the company said medical and health conditions were cited as the cause in some deaths, and in other cases involved improper use of the sleeper.

Shortly after, Americans heard from the AAP: “This product is deadly and should be recalled immediately.”

Despite the AAP recommendations, Fisher-Price managed to introduce the Rock n’ Play and sold it for a decade. Before the recall, it was selling for $40 to $149 at various retailers. The product sits elevated in a canopy-like environment for sleeping and sitting and featuring a “motorized rocking motion” and musical tunes. The problem is when a baby’s head falls forward or sideways. This can block the child’s access to oxygen.

Parents should do careful research when buying children’s products. Monitor the CPSC website for warnings and recalls, as well as the Consumer Reports website. We can expect to hear more about the dangers of other sleeper products in the near future, as Consumer Reports continues its investigation. On April 11, it reported on four other child deaths linked to Kids II sleepers.

More Reading:
Fisher-Price Rock ‘n Play Sleeper Should Be Recalled Immediately, Consumer Reports

Fisher-Price Rock ‘n Play Recall, New York Times

Buying Safe Toys, Breakstone, White & Gluck Project KidSafe 

Contact the CPSC About Dangerous Products and Injuries
If you are ever injured while using a consumer product, you should contact the CPSC to report the injury. The CPSC is the federal agency responsible for overseeing the recall process, releasing warnings to the public and collecting injury data. The CPSC works with manufacturers to issue product recalls.


Free Legal Consultation – Contact a Boston Product Liability Lawyer

If you have been injured, it is also in your best interests to consult a Boston product liability attorney. At Breakstone, White & Gluck, our Boston attorneys have represented clients injured by defective products, medical devices and vehicles. Prompt investigation is necessary in product liability cases and our attorneys are known for our thorough, detailed and capable investigation.
For a free legal consultation, contact our lawyers today at 800-379-1244 or 617-723-7676 or use our contact form.

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fisherpricetruck.jpgFisher-Price has recalled a popular toy truck after its plastic handle has been found to pose a laceration risk.

The East Aurora, New York toymaker recalled its Little People® Builders’ Load ‘n Go Wagon in cooperation with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and Health Canada this week. About 208,000 defective toy trucks were recalled in the United States and 2,800 in Canada. The toy trucks were sold in mass merchandise retail stores nationwide from June 2009 through July 2011 for about $25. They were manufactured in Mexico.

The toy truck is being recalled because its plastic handle has molded-in reinforcement. If a child falls on it, he could suffer a laceration.

The CPSC and Fisher-Price are aware of seven reports of personal injuries. Five reports came from children requiring surgical glue or stitches.

Consumers affected by the Fisher-Price recall can call 800-432-5437 or visit www.service.mattel.com for a free repair kit. The recall involves the wagon with the model number P8977. More information is available on the Mattel website.

Product recalls and deaths related to unsafe toys have declined in recent years, but toy-related injuries have been increasing. In 2009, 186,000 children under 15 were treated for toy-related injuries in emergency rooms, up from 152,000 in 2005.

In 2009, 12 children under 15 suffered wrongful deaths involving defective toys, a 50 percent decrease over the two prior years. Meanwhile, in 2010 there were 44 toy recalls, a significant drop from 172 in 2008.

The CPSC offers a few tips for parents: purchase age-appropriate toys, include safety gear whenever you buy sports equipment and ride-on toys and always be aware of your child’s location during play. Parents should also closely inspect toys prior to giving them to children.
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In the year’s largest recall, Fisher-Price has pulled more than 11 million children’s bikes, high chairs and other toys from the shelves. The recall impacts consumers in the United States and Canada. Parents in the two countries are asked to check their homes and immediately stop using any products on the recall list.

The Fisher-Price recall included nearly 50 types of products, including over 7 million tricycles such as the Hot Wheels Trike and the Barbie Butterfly Trike. These toys have a protruding part that can cut children. The company received 10 reports of children being injured.

A million high chairs sold under 23 different names were recalled. The high chairs can cut children on the legs. Seven children required stitches.

The Fisher-Price recall also included 2.8 million infant toys with inflatable balls. The balls have a valve that easily comes off and poses a choking hazard. Also recalled for creating a choking hazard were 120,000 car toys with small plastic wheels that easily come off.

For a full list of recalled toys, click here. Consumers impacted can contact the company’s recall information web page.

Fisher-Price, based in East Aurora, New York, is owned by Mattel, of El Segundo, California. The company recalled the toys voluntarily in partnership with the Consumer Product Safety Commission and Health Canada.

The Fisher-Price recall is a reminder parents need to test toys themselves and watch their children while playing. For infants and younger children, one way to judge whether a toy is a choking hazard is to take a toilet paper roll. Hold the toy or toy piece up to the toilet paper roll. If it’s small enough to slide through, it poses a hazard for your young child.
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