Articles Tagged with “Boston personal injury lawyers”

Woman with SUV door open, putting cyclists at risk for dooring injuries.

Drivers are encouraged to watch for cyclists before they open vehicle doors because they could cause a dooring accident and seriously injure a cyclist.

In 2016, Cambridge resident Michael Charney began to push the Dutch Reach method for safely exiting vehicles in Massachusetts. His advocacy has greatly raised awareness about the technique, which encourages drivers and passengers to take a few simple steps and look for cyclists before opening their car doors (you can watch a quick video demonstration on his website). The goal is to prevent dooring injuries to cyclists. Now, he and other cyclists in the Boston area are celebrating another push forward: the rideshare company Lyft has added a notification to its app, alerting passengers stepping out of vehicles to look for cyclists.

“I’m delighted to see that Lyft has embraced the Dutch Reach, and the term Dutch Reach,” Charney told The Boston Globe.

Lyft has added the new feature in response to feedback from transportation advocates all over the country. In Massachusetts, a coalition of Boston-area cycling groups and committees teamed up in February and sent letters to both Uber and Lyft, reminding them that drivers have a responsibility not to obstruct bike lanes under Massachusetts law (M.G.L c. 89 § 4D). More than a dozen groups signed on, including the Somerville Bicycle Committee, MassBike, Boston Cyclists Union, Arlington Bicycle Advisory Commission, Medford Bicycle Advisory Commission and Bikes Not Bombs.

The coalition had called for the rideshare companies to take six steps:

  • Create the new app feature, which pushes warnings to passengers as they step out.
  • Educate drivers on their responsibility not to block bike lanes.
  • Adopt procedures to ensure drivers obey bike lane laws and create serious consequences for violations, including loss of rideshare privileges.
  • Share data regarding bike lane violations by rideshare drivers with the state and local communities.
  • Add a user feedback section related to bicycle safety.
  • Work with cities and towns to promote use of Loading Zones and Passenger Drop-Off Zones.

Boston and other major cities have already started creating specialized zones where rideshare passengers can safely board and exit. In March, the City of Boston announced a pilot program creating a dedicated rideshare activity zone in Fenway. Between 5 p.m. and 8 a.m., four spaces along Boylston Street, two north of Kimarnock Street and two south. During other hours, the spaces revert to metered parking. While part of the goal is preventing rideshare accidents, part of the goal is streamlining traffic flow to make things more predictable for rideshare drivers and residents.

While Lyft has added the new push notification to prevent bike dooring, both major rideshare companies have heard concerns about bicycle accidents and dooring injuries. Both companies also offer different perspectives than in the past. Both companies purchased bikeshare operating businesses to compliment their rideshare services in 2018. Uber acquired Jump and Lyft bought Motivate, becoming the largest bikeshare operator in the U.S. – and Boston. As part of the transaction, Lyft essentially became the new operator of BlueBikes, the regional bikeshare serving Boston, Somerville, Cambridge and Brookline. BlueBikes is still owned by the municipalities.

In 2018, Blue Cross Blue Shield took over as title sponsor. New Balance had been the original founding sponsor of the bike share in 2011, when it launched as Hubway (Some background: this isn’t the first time ownership of the regional bikeshare operating company has changed. Back in 2011, the original operator of Hubway was Alta Bicycles, which was then bought by Motivate, which operated the regional bike share from 2015 to last year).

Uber has not announced plans to join the bikeshare business in Massachusetts, but both companies – who went public earlier this year – have expressed interest in offering scooter rentals. Several companies have expressed interest in scooters, including Lime, the major operator of dockless bikes in the Boston area.  Many companies are waiting for Massachusetts lawmakers to approve legislation clarifying their rights to rent out scooters here.

Local communities regulate bikeshares. But rideshare safety regulations come from the state. Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker signed the state’s first bill regulating rideshare vehicles into law in 2016. This bill required rideshare drivers to purchase minimum levels of auto insurance and required background checks for the first.

Industry regulations were a start. Now attention must be paid to safety and what’s happening on the street. We have heard from the cyclists. Other initial research has already shown that ridesharing is associated with a 2-3 percent increase in fatal traffic accidents in U.S. cities (Source: Sept. 2018 paper presented at the Stigler Center for the Study of Economy and the State at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business).

Breakstone, White & Gluck – Boston Personal Injury Lawyers
Breakstone, White & Gluck is based in Government Center in Boston. Our personal injury lawyers specialize in representing those injured in car accidents, bicycle accidents and pedestrian accidents, including those involving rideshare vehicles. For a free legal consultation, contact our attorneys and learn your rights at 800-379-1244 or 617-723-7676. You can also send us a message use our contact form.

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Settlement was reached during trial in Middlesex Superior Court

Attorney Ronald E. Gluck, a Boston personal injury lawyer

Attorney Ronald E. Gluck

Breakstone, White & Gluck successfully resolved a mild traumatic brain injury case  for our client, who was injured when heavy snow collapsed from a commercial warehouse roof onto her vehicle. During the recent jury trial in Middlesex Superior Court, Attorney Ron Gluck presented testimony from multiple expert witnesses including  a neurologist and  a meteorologist, who testified in support of his client’s case.

Four days into the trial,  the defendants made an offer that represented an 800% increase from  the pre- trial offer and the case was settled at that time, just before it would have gone to the jury for deliberation.  The settlement provides significant compensation for the injuries and damages that our client suffered.

Defendants
Attorney Gluck presented evidence showing that the three defendants – the property owner,  the property management company, and the company that leased the warehouse – took no action to remove snow from the warehouse roof and awning following 20 to 24 inches of snowfall. Defendants had a duty to provide a safe environment for those legally visiting the property, such as our client who was making a delivery to the loading dock at the time of her injury.

Trial and Litigation
Through extensive depositions taken during the litigation it was proven that the defendant corporations failed to establish policies for snow removal from the awning, which was located directly above the loading dock, and that none of the employees of the defendant corporations had any understanding of whose responsibility it was to remove snow from the roof. As a result, snow remained on the awning after a historic snow storm and fell onto the liftgate of plaintiff’s vehicle which slammed down onto her head, causing her injuries.

At trial, it was proven that our client was instructed to park her car directly below the awning in spite of the fact that the defendant was aware that snow had fallen from the awning onto the loading dock on prior occasions and that they knew it presented a danger to anyone standing under that awning.

The evidence presented at trial established that our client suffered a traumatic brain injury which caused multiple symptoms including memory loss, mood alteration, dizziness, headaches and involuntary movement of her limbs.  She underwent a long regimen of medical treatment for her injuries.

Settlement
At the beginning of the trial, the defendants denied that they were negligent and that their negligence caused our client’s injuries. But, as the trial proceeded and Attorney Gluck presented evidence, the defendants’ settlement offers grew each day until the case was settled on day four.

Breakstone, White & Gluck – Free Legal Consultation: 800-379-1244

Breakstone, White & Gluck is known for our exemplary trial experience. Not every case can be or should be settled out of court. When our attorneys go to trial, we do so with the respect of our colleagues and judges, bringing over 100 years combined experience before Massachusetts trial and appeals courts. We are known for our successful outcomes and for holding defendants, from individuals and insurance companies, to the MBTA and corporations, accountable for their negligence to our clients.

At Breakstone, White & Gluck, each of our partners has over 35 years of experience representing clients in serious personal injury claims in Massachusetts. Our attorneys have successfully presented our clients’ cases before the trial courts, the Appeals Court and the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court.

If you have been injured, we can advise you on whether you may have the legal right to seek compensation. For a free legal consultation, contact us at 800-379-1244 or 617-723-7676 or use our contact form.

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As part of our Project KidSafe campaign, Breakstone, White & Gluck was pleased to donate bicycle helmets in Watertown over the weekend. The Watertown Bicycle & Pedestrian Committee set up outside the Little League fields and reached out to children and parents, answering safety questions and fitting free helmets for children who needed one.  Committee members gave away roughly 70 of our Project KidSafe helmets.

This is the fifth year Breakstone, White & Gluck has donated bicycle helmets in partnership with the Watertown Bicycle & Pedestrian Committee. Over the years, Breakstone, White & Gluck has given more than 500 Project KidSafe bicycle helmets to children in the Watertown community.

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(Photo credit: Watertown Bicycle & Pedestrian Committee Facebook)

Breakstone, White & Gluck launched its Project KidSafe campaign in 2013, with a goal of keeping children safe on bikes in Massachusetts. We have since donated over 25,000 bicycle helmets to children in partnership with local bicycle committees, police departments, schools and other community organizations. Bicycle committees are a key part of our campaign, helping children and families select and fit helmets at fun and casual gatherings alongside friends and neighbors.

About Breakstone, White & Gluck
Breakstone, White & Gluck is a Boston personal injury law firm which represents individuals who have been injured by the negligence and wrongdoing of others in Massachusetts. With more than 100 years combined experience, our lawyers are recognized throughout Massachusetts and New England for their work representing those injured. We are committed to supporting bicycle safety, supporting MassBike, Boston Bicyclists Union and other Boston-area bicycle clubs.

To learn more, visit Breakstone, White & Gluck’s website or our Project KidSafe campaign.

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Should students have to wait until they finish 7th grade to play football in Massachusetts? Lawmakers are being asked to consider legislation to delay the start of play to protect players from concussions.

“An Act for No Organized Head Impacts to Schoolchildren,” has been filed by State representatives Paul A. Schmid III (D-8th Bristol) and Bradley H. Jones Jr. (R-20th Middlesex). The legislation would ban children in 7th grade or younger from playing or practicing any form of organized tackle football. Schools would be held accountable and face fines for violations:

  • $2,000 for each violation
  • $5,000 for subsequent violations
  • $10,000 when serious physical harm result to participants

Children would be allowed to play flag football or any form of football which does not involve tackle play. The proposal does not include any other sport.

Causes of Concussions

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) define a traumatic brain injury (TBI) as a disruption to the brain caused by a blow or jolt to the head. Concussions are considered a mild TBI, which can result in a brief change of mental alertness or consciousness. A severe TBI can result in a longer period of unconsciousness or mental change.

Symptoms may not be immediately evident after a concussion, especially if the person or those around them are not familiar with the symptoms, which can include an inability to think clearly, memory problems, feeling dazed and mood, behavior or personality changes. Headaches, nausea and vomiting can also set in.

Beyond the sports field, falls are the leading cause of concussions, according to the CDC. Adults over age 65 and children under 14 are most likely to suffer a fall leading to a head injury. Car crashes are the third leading cause of concussions, followed by being struck in the head by an unspecified object, such as in a construction site accident or by violence.

Concussions can also happen on the sports field. Not every contact necessarily results in a concussion, but to identify injuries, Massachusetts and other states have already passed concussion education and training laws. Known as “return to play” laws, these require high school and middle school students to be examined by a medical professional before they can participate in sports again.

Research on Concussions and the Impact on Younger Football Players

New research shows there is a measurable impact when younger children play football. In a study of 26 football players – all age 12 – Wake Forest researchers found changes in the corpus callosum, which joins the two sides of the brain and integrates cognitive, motor and sensory functions. The players underwent MRIs to examine the changes prior to the three-month season and three months after the season concluded. They were compared to 22 other students who did not participate in contact sports.

Players who suffer a concussion need proper rest and treatment so they can properly heal and to reduce the chance for another injury. Researchers have documented this risk; one study found high school and college students who sustained concussions were four to six times more likely to suffer a second injury (Source: McGill University in Montreal).

Concussion Legislation Filed in Other States

Map of U.S. states considering concussion prevention legislation that would ban children younger than 12 or in seventh grade or younger from playing tackle football.

Lawmakers in Massachusetts and five other states have proposed banning tackle football for children younger than 12 or for those in seventh grade or younger. Data from Shape America.

Massachusetts isn’t taking the field alone on concussions. At least five other states are also debating tackle football bans for children under age 12. These states include Illinois, California, Maryland, New York and New Jersey, according to Boston.comBut none of the proposals are on track to reach state governors.

All 50 states already have “return to play” laws aimed at reducing youth sports-related concussions, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Washington state was the first to pass such a law in 2009. By 2015, every other state had enacted a similar law.

In most states, these laws mandate concussion awareness training and education to prevent concussions among student athletes. According to Shape America, 48 states require students suspected of having concussions to sit out at least 24 hours. 

Arizona and South Carolina allow students back on the field the same day with a doctor’s approval.

Passed in July 2010, the Massachusetts concussion law requires parents, volunteers, coaches and school nurses to receive specialized concussion awareness training. This is to help them recognize concussion symptoms and help students receive treatment as soon as possible.

As in other states, the Massachusetts law requires medical clearance before students can return to sports. Schools are then required to maintain detailed record-keeping related to a student’s injury and progress in the classroom and on the field. The law is M.G.L. ch.111 §222. The Code of Massachusetts Regulations is 105 CMR 201.000.

All middle and high schools which offer sports through the Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association (MIAA) must follow the concussion safety law.

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Walk to the Hill banner for Breakstone, White & Gluck

Breakstone, White & Gluck participated and supported the Equal Justice Coalition’s Walk to the Hill 2019 at the Massachusetts State House.

Breakstone, White & Gluck was pleased to support and participate in the Equal Justice Coalition’s Walk to the Hill, seeking increased funding for civil legal aid in Massachusetts. Attorney David W. White joined hundreds of lawyers at the Massachusetts State House, urging legislators to help fund free legal services to residents who cannot afford an attorney on their own. Many Massachusetts residents are not familiar with the coalition until they need help with a landlord dispute, consumer fraud or another non-criminal matter. Then the coalition’s services become critical because when someone faces criminal charges, they have the right to an attorney. But those who need representation in a civil matter are on their own. If they can’t afford a lawyer, the person could suffer devastating losses, personally and financially. With more funding for civil legal aid, the coalition and other legal aid organizations can help more individuals and families stay on track, in their homes, working, receiving medical treatment or going to school without interruption.

The Equal Justice Coalition was created in 1999 by the Boston Bar Association, the Massachusetts Bar Association and the Massachusetts Legal Assistance Corporation. Representatives from these programs participated in a speaking program in the Great Hall at the State House, before attorneys began visiting lawmakers’ offices. Speakers included Louis Tompros, chair of the Equal Justice Coalition; Lynne M. Parker, Executive Director of the Mass. Legal Assistance Corporation; Supreme Judicial Court Chief Justice Ralph Gants; Christopher Kenney, President of the Massachusetts Bar Association and Jacquelynne Bowman, Executive Director of the Greater Boston Legal Services.

courthouseFor decades, the Massachusetts courts have adhered to the “transitory water doctrine.” Simply put, under this common law standard, Massachusetts property owners have generally been shielded from liability in slip and fall cases when an injury results from normal use in wet weather. For example, a customer who wears boots in the snow and tracks water into a store, causing another customer to slip.

Established more than 40 years ago, the transitory water doctrine has set the legal standard for property owners. With no incentive to avoid liability, large commercial property owners were virtually free from worries about injuries caused by water tracked in from outside. Make no mistake: many people have been badly hurt right after crossing the threshold of a store, where the water and grime are most concentrated.

But this may change, after a recent ruling by Superior Court Judge Cornelius J. Moriarty II.

Traffic jam

As a record-number of holiday travelers hit the road, Boston will be especially hard hit this week, according to AAA’s travel forecast.

However you celebrate, we hope you enjoy a festive holiday season, filled with friends, family, holiday events or volunteering.

But most of all, here at Breakstone, White & Gluck, our attorneys hope you commit to travel safely during the holidays. While it’s the season for giving, Thanksgiving to New Year’s brings some of the most dangerous days on the roads.

AAA is forecasting a record-breaking 112.5 million holiday travelers – or 1 in 3 Americans. This represents a 4.4 percent increase over last year. More than 102 million will travel by car, the highest number in 17 years. The forecast holds bad news for Boston though. On Wednesday afternoon, we could end up with one of the longest commutes in the nation.

Tips for driving safely for the holiday season:

Plan for Boston holiday travelers. AAA and INRIX forecast this Thursday, Dec. 20th, will be the most congested day nationwide. Boston is on a list of 10 holiday hot spots, with the worst travel expected on Wednesday, Dec. 19th. The absolute worst time to drive is 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. that day and you can expect the commute to take 3.5 times as long. It’s hard to believe the forecast is so terrible. It’s based on historical data and recent travel trends.

Unfortunately, this heavy traffic won’t just impact those starting their holiday commute; it will also challenge workers, school buses, delivery services and just about all of us.

Make a plan. Take public transportation if you can. Adjust your work hours if your employer allows it. Services like Waze and Mass511 can help you navigate and take away some of the stress.

Buckle up. Wear your seat belt at all times. When driving others, ask if they are buckled up before you start moving. People really need the reminder. Even after years of safety campaigns, nearly 10 percent of Americans are still not wearing seat belts, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). In 2016, seat belts could have saved more than 2,400 people killed in car accidents (Source: NHTSA).

The day before you travel, also take time to check your children’s car seats, so they are properly secured.

Plan enough space for holiday gifts. When traveling with gifts or food, make sure you leave enough space so you can see through your windows.

Watch your speed, especially near pedestrians. Speeding is involved in one-third of all traffic fatalities, according to the NHTSA. It is also a leading cause in car accidents which injure pedestrians. Commit to traveling the speed limit or slower if you need to adjust for weather conditions, dark roads or unfamiliar areas. Have patience in parking lots and remember, during the holiday season, pedestrians may be out later at night.

Drive sober. If you celebrate outside your home, our suggestion is to skip the alcohol and focus instead on all you are grateful for this year. If you plan to drink, choose a designated driver whom you trust not to drink. As a backup, install the Uber and Lyft apps on your phone.

Drunk drivers killed 10,874 people in motor vehicle crashes in 2017, representing 29 percent of all traffic fatalities in the U.S., according to the NHTSA. Here in Massachusetts, drunk drivers caused 34 percent of all traffic deaths.

As personal injury attorneys who represent those injured by drunk drivers, we know firsthand that when someone is killed by a drunk driver, nothing is ever the same for the family. Drunk driving accidents are senseless, entirely preventable had the driver just made a better decision.

As for drunk drivers, they can be criminally charged and expect to face a civil lawsuit, as can others in certain cases, including bars and restaurants in liquor liability cases.

Marijuana will be in greater supply this year, after retail stores have opened for recreational marijuana sales in Massachusetts. Use good judgment. Do not consume marijuana when you are driving. Users are about 25 percent more likely to crash than other drivers, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

No distracted driving. We cannot say it enough: it’s critical to put your cell phone away when you are driving, especially in heavy traffic. Tell your loved ones your phone is off the hook until you stop driving and turn your engine off. Stay committed to that. Don’t engage in texting while driving, reading e-mail or checking Facebook when driving.

Have your directions ready in advance. If you are driving long distance with children, make sure you have snacks, books, coloring sets or games prepared. If possible, drive with another adult so they can respond to your children and make an emergency call if necessary.

Finally, plan ahead and decide where you want to take rest breaks.

Emergency supplies. Do everything you can to ensure you reach your destination safely. Carry cash, a credit card and an emergency kit containing: a mobile phone charger, a first-aid kit, water and snacks, a flashlight and extra batteries, warning flares, jumper cables and a basic tool kit. And don’t forget ice scrapers, shovels and blankets.


Additional resources:

AAA’s Holiday Travel Forecast for 2018

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

2017 Data: Alcohol-Impaired Driving, NHTSA


About Breakstone, White & Gluck

Free Legal Consultation: 800-379-1244

For more than 25 years, Breakstone, White & Gluck has represented those injured by car accidents in Massachusetts. Our Boston car accident lawyers are known for our top results for clients and their families. We have consistently been recognized for our results, including by Massachusetts Super Lawyers, Top 100 New England Super Lawyers and Top 100 Massachusetts Super Lawyers. 

If you have been injured, learn your legal rights. For a free legal consultation, contact Breakstone, White & Gluck at 800-379-1244 or 617-723-7676. You can also use our contact form.

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Attorney David W. White and his wife Denise Murphy recently enjoyed a visit with Boston Police Commissioner William Gross and Superintendent Dennis White, the Commissioner’s chief of staff. The visit was to thank the Boston Police Department for supporting Breakstone, White & Gluck’s Project KidSafe campaign for a third year in 2018, helping us get 160 bicycle helmets to children who needed one in Boston.

We are pleased to partner with the Boston Police Department. In the city of Boston, when families get the opportunity to meet a police officer, they quickly come to respect them and the importance of wearing bicycle helmets. Then, what’s great is we see families – parents and children – committing to protect themselves. And it has a ripple effect on neighbors, friends.

Boston Police Department bike safety and bicycle helmet donation from Breakstone, White & Gluck of Boston

Attorney David W. White with Boston Police Commissioner William Gross and Superintendent Dennis White, the Commissioner’s Chief of Staff. In 2018, Breakstone, White & Gluck was pleased to partner with Boston Police Department for the third year through our Project KidSafe campaign and donate bicycle helmets to the Boston Police Department to distribute to children who needed one (Photo courtesy: Boston Police Department).

Best Lawyers Best Law Firms Tier 1 rating for Breakstone, White & Gluck.

Breakstone, White & Gluck was recognized with a 2019 Tier 1 ranking in the specialty of personal injury litigation for plaintiffs in Boston.

We are pleased to announce that Breakstone, White & Gluck of Boston has received a Tier 1 ranking from the U.S. News – Best Lawyers® 2019 edition of “Best Law Firms.” The firm received the Tier 1 ranking in the specialty of personal injury litigation for plaintiffs in Boston.

Breakstone, White & Gluck and our attorneys have been selected for U.S. News – Best Lawyers® and “Best Law Firms” rankings this year and in the past. In this year’s Best Lawyers ratings, Marc L. Breakstone, David W. White and Ronald E. Gluck were selected for individual recognition in various areas of our practice, including personal injury litigation – plaintiffs, insurance law, medical malpractice and professional malpractice.

The “Best Law Firms” rankings are based on a rigorous evaluation process that includes client and lawyer evaluations, peer reviews from other attorneys and other information provided by law firms.

Breakstone, White & Gluck is a top-rated Boston personal injury law firm with over 100 years combined experience and record-setting awards and settlements. Across Massachusetts and New England, our lawyers are known for our unwavering commitment to reach the best financial outcome for every client. We have earned recognition from “Best Law Firms” and Best Lawyers, along with Top 100 New England Super Lawyers and Top 100 Massachusetts Super Lawyers. Our attorneys hold top professional and ethical ratings from Martindale-Hubbell.

Our Attorneys

Attorney Marc L. Breakstone, a Boston personal injury lawyer and medical malpractice lawyer

Attorney Marc L. Breakstone

Attorney David W. White, a Boston personal injury lawyer

Attorney David W. White

Attorney Ronald E. Gluck, a Boston personal injury lawyer

Attorney Ronald E. Gluck

Attorney Reza Breakstone, a Boston personal injury lawyer

Attorney Reza Breakstone

Our Practice
Our firm specializes in personal injury and medical malpractice cases, including those involving catastrophic injuries and traumatic brain injury, including:

Free Legal Consultation
Boston Personal Injury Lawyers – Worcester Personal Injury Lawyers
If you have been injured, it is important to consult an experienced Boston personal injury lawyer or Worcester personal injury lawyer to learn your rights. You may have the right to obtain financial compensation for your injuries. Our attorneys represent those injured across Massachusetts, including in Boston, Waltham, Framingham, Cape Cod, Brockton, Plymouth, Worcester, the North Shore, the South Shore and Western Massachusetts.

For a free legal consultation, call our firm at 800-379-1244 or 617-723-7676 or use our contact form.

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Dynacraft Ride-on Toy recalled in 2017

Dynacraft Ride-on Toys recalled 20,000 battery-operated ride-on toys after reports that the pedals were not working in 2017. Always check for product recalls before you buy any holiday toy. Photo credit: Consumer Product Safety Commission notices.

Battery-operated ride-on toys may look like fun holiday gifts. Parents and grandparents even have their choice of models, including the Jeep, Mercedes-Benz and Lamborghini to name a few.

Shoppers can get easily caught up in the “cuteness” factor. It’s not that simple, though. Ride-on toys can be heavy and motorized. Be cautious when buying, even with push or pedal ride-on toys, because you are trusting these toys to support your child.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has been working to improve safety for ride-on toys, because children have suffered injuries and even deaths. In 2016, three children died in riding toys in toy-related injuries, all encounters with motor vehicles (Source: CPSC). Riding toys, motorized and non-motorized, were associated with the highest number of toy-related deaths that year – or 43 percent.

Before you buy, please step on the brakes and consider our safety tips.

Potential Harm: Motor Vehicles and Fires

Why are riding toy cars so dangerous? The greatest danger is children can be hit by adult-sized vehicles. But motorized toy cars can also overheat, as a North Andover family learned last August. A mother had the terrifying experience of having to pull her children out of a toy car, just after smoke started coming from the hood and before the flames. Other potential issues are children can attempt to stand and cars can tip, resulting in head injuries. Remote controls can provide parents a false sense of security. Parents may have more control just pushing their children in a non-motorized toy/

Safety Tips for Buying Ride-on Toy Cars

  • Steer clear of motorized, battery-operated toy cars. Consider buying a tricycle or another non-motorized toy instead.
  • If you buy a battery-operated toy car, look for the age recommendation. Many of these toys are recommended for children age 2+, which we feel is too young. But the age recommendation is a starting point for many families.
  • Check the label to see if the riding toy meets the CPSC’s toy safety standards. In 2016, the federal toy safety standard, ASTM F963, was specifically updated to address overload, stability and restraints on riding toys.
  • Check if the toy car has been recalled on the CPSC website.
  • It’s not just toy cars. Any riding toy with a motor can malfunction. Last March, the CPSC recalled these Radio Flyer electric wagons due to motor problems.
  • Read the product specifications and instructions online before purchasing. Consider whether you have the time for this type of toy.
  • Test the riding toy before your child rides.
  • Always supervise your children when they ride. Stay on the driveway and sidewalks near your home. Fenced in areas, such as backyards, are best if the product is designed for use on grassy surfaces.
  • Protect your child’s head with a bicycle helmet.
  • Follow instructions for properly seating your child. Ride one child at a time.
  • Find a safe place to park the riding toy. Commit to properly securing it after each use.
  • Keep the box. When your child outgrows the riding toy, remove it from your home.

Free Legal Consultation: 800-379-1244

For more than 25 years, Breakstone, White & Gluck has represented those who have been injured or killed by defective products which should have never been sold. This holiday season, our Boston personal injury lawyers are committed to helping consumers make informed buying decisions to prevent toy-related injuries.

Learn more about Breakstone, White & Gluck: www.bwglaw.com. If you have been injured, our attorneys offer a free legal consultation and can help explain your rights for seeking potential compensation. Call 800-379-1244 or 617-723-7676 or use our contact form.

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