Articles Posted in Motorcycle Accidents

Motorcycle riding down open roadMotorcycle season is almost here. For riders, this means goodbye snow and cold; hello to the open road.

Good pre-season preparation is essential for motorcyclists. Take some time to inspect your motorcycle and helmet and review the Massachusetts driving manual. Review your auto insurance as well; most drivers and motorcyclists do not carry enough insurance.

Wear a Helmet. Under Massachusetts law, motorcyclists must wear helmets which have been approved by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Helmets save lives so make sure yours is in good condition. If you have been involved in a motorcycle accident or fall, replace your helmet.

Boston Personal Injury Attorney Ronald E. GluckAttorney Ronald E. Gluck recently reached a $1.25 million dollar settlement in a case involving serious injuries resulting from a motorcycle accident which occurred in Massachusetts.

Attorney Gluck, who has successfully represented seriously injured motorcyclists for over thirty five years, obtained the full insurance liability policy limits for our client from the defendant’s insurance company.

The motorcycle accident occurred when the offending driver of a sedan made a sudden left turn in front of our client’s motorcycle, cutting off his path of travel and leaving him no room to stop. As a result he crashed into the side of the sedan, and suffered life altering injuries.

A truck and a motorcycle after a fatal accident in West Bridgewater, MassachusettsAttorney Marc Breakstone recently settled a wrongful death case for the family of a motorcyclist for $3.5 million. The case was settled in March 2016.

The motorcyclist was tragically killed by a waste disposal truck in West Bridgewater in 2013. The truck, which was being operated by a subcontractor, pulled out across the road in the path of the motorcyclist. The motorcyclist applied the brakes and laid down his motorcycle, attempting to avoid the collision and struck the defendant’s truck at less than 5 mph.

The motorcyclist continued to roll under the truck. The truck driver did not see him and ran the rear tires over his body, killing him.

motorcyclist-20140530.jpgBefore June begins, we have a final thought for May, which was Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month.

Motorcycle use continues to grow in the U.S. but so do motorcycle accidents. For 15 years now, we have seen an annual increase in motorcyclist fatalities, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The one exception was 2009. When motorcyclists survive, they are also suffering more non-fatal injuries. In 2012, 93,000 motorcycling injuries were reported, 12,000 more injuries than in 2011.

A few safety reminders for drivers:

  • Remember motorcyclists have all the same rights, privileges and responsibilities as other motorists.
  • Allow motorcyclists a full lane width.
  • Give motorcyclists extra following distance when you are behind them.
  • Before you switch lanes, always check your vehicle’s mirrors and your blind spot for motorcyclists.
  • Make sure you signal your intention to change lanes or merge with traffic.
  • Do not rely on a motorcyclist’s flashing turn signal. The rider may have forgotten to turn it off or it may not be self-cancelling.

A few safety reminders for motorcyclists:

  • Remember to wear your helmet and do not let any passengers ride without one. In 2012, overall motorcycle helmet use fell to 60 percent. Passenger helmet use dropped to 46 percent.
  • Wear reflective tape whenever possible.
  • Do not consume alcohol when you are operating.
  • Obey traffic laws. You must have a special license to operate a motorcycle in Massachusetts and that is important. Some 24 percent of all riders who are involved in fatal motorcycle crashes are operating with invalid licenses.

Our Experience Representing Injured Riders
The Boston personal injury lawyers at Breakstone, White & Gluck have over 100 years combined experience handling automobile and motorcycle accident cases.

Read about one case attorney Ronald Gluck handled for an injured motorcyclist. Gluck’s client was seriously injured when a negligent driver cut into his lane and struck his motorcycle. He suffered numerous injuries, including facial fractures, concussions, blindness in one eye and a shoulder injury and had to undergo surgeries. Gluck negotiated a $3.75 million settlement.

Read about the case on our website.

Read the client’s review on Avvo or below.

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motorcycle-helmet-180.jpgFor motorcyclists, the most effective way to prevent a brain injury is to wear a helmet. An unhelmeted motorcyclist is 40 percent more likely to suffer a fatal head injury in a motorcycle crash than one wearing a helmet, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

In Massachusetts and 19 other states, wearing a motorcycle helmet is the law for all riders. Twenty eight other states have laws requiring certain motorcyclists wear helmets. Three states, including New Hampshire, do not require motorcycle helmets for any riders.

Helmet use has grown in recent years as safety education has increased and manufacturers produce lighter-weight helmets. Helmet use increased from 48 percent of U.S. motorcyclists in 2005 to 67 percent in 2009, according to the NHTSA.

If you are a motorcyclist, it is important to protect yourself from motorcycle accidents as well as comply with the law. Our Boston motorcycle accident lawyers share some background information and tips for purchasing your motorcycle helmet:

Types of Helmets. Be sure to buy a helmet which is specifically designed for motorcycling. You may use different helmets for other activities, but these do not provide adequate protection in case of a motorcycle accident.

There are three types of helmets: full-face helmets; three-quarter, open-face helmets and “shorty” half helmets. A full-face helmet covers your entire face and provides the most protection. It has a moveable face shield which protects your eyes from debris and face in a motorcycle accident.

A three-quarter, open-face helmet has many of the same features, minus the face and chin protection of a full-face helmet. If you use an open-face helmet, it is recommended you also use a snap-on face shield or a pair of safety goggles when you ride.

The last type of helmet, a “shorty” half-helmet is not recommended by most safety organizations. It protects very little of your head and is the most likely to come off when you ride.

Safety Ratings. Since 1980, all adult-sized helmets for highway use have been required to meet the Department of Transportation (DOT) standards. Make sure your helmet has a DOT sticker before you purchase. The Snell Memorial Foundation is another safety testing laboratory for motorcycle helmets, though this rating is voluntary for helmet manufacturers.

Helmet Size. Most helmets are marked small, medium, large or extra large. Fit is important so measure your head at the largest circumference and contact your manufacturer to ask what size that measurement fits.

The goal is to avoid buying a helmet which is too large and can fall off. Here are a few things to note. The cheek pads should touch your cheeks without pressing uncomfortably. On full-face helmets, press on the chin piece. The helmet or face shield should not touch your nose or chin. There should be no gaps between your temples and brow pads. If the helmet has a neck roll, it should not push the helmet away from the back of your neck.

Replacing and Caring for Helmets. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for caring for your helmet. It is best to use mild soap, water and a soft cloth. Avoid any petroleum-based cleaning fluid, which can cause the helmet to decompose over time.

Replace your helmet if the face shield is scratched as this will obstruct your view when riding. You should also replace your helmet if you’re involved in a motorcycle crash or if you notice any damage. Otherwise, many manufacturers recommend replacing your motorcycle helmet every two years.

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motorcycle rider.jpgMay has arrived and as motorcycling season begins, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is observing Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month.

The national initiative aims to encourage drivers and motorcyclists to “share the road” and highlights that motorcycles are vehicles with the same rights and privileges as any other motor vehicle on the road.

This is an important point because most motorcycle accidents involve passenger vehicles and trucks. Many motorcycle accidents result from a lack of understanding and awareness on the part of both or either party. Many times, drivers will say they fail to see motorcyclists until just before an accident.